Grading Policies for Middle & High School: Making It Meaningful & Increasing Student Accountability

September 23, 2016

The red pen is mighty, but are you maximizing its impact? Middle school and high school English Language Arts teachers discussed what work is graded and what work isn't, and how to hold students accountable for implementing feedback. Teachers also shared their experiences with standards based grading, thoughts on students grading themselves, and tips for making grading easier. Read through the chat for ideas to implement in your own classroom.
This #2ndaryELA Twitter chat was all about grading policies in the ELA classroom. Middle school and high school English Language Arts teachers discussed what work is graded and what work isn't, and how to hold students accountable for implementing feedback. Teachers also shared their experiences with standards based grading, thoughts on students grading themselves, and tips for making grading easier.

Read through the chat below for ideas on what type of assignments should carry the most weight and how to use rubrics and conferencing to encourage revision and reflection. You'll find ways to simplify grading using gradebook/rubric codes and a check system instead of points. You'll also get ideas about how to use technology to lighten the marking load.

Hope you'll join us next Tuesday September 27th at 8pm EST to talk about reading and writing workshop. We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group (even if you aren't on Twitter). 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction. 

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