On My Bookshelf: Emerson Page and Where The Light Enters by Christa Avampato

January 29, 2018

Emerson Page and Where The Light Enters by Christa Avampato is filled with beautifully descriptive language that conjures up images of magical places and its references to other works of literature make a reading nerd like me feel right at home. Read on for more of my review and ideas for classroom application.
The basic plot from Amazon: Thirteen-year-old Emerson Page wants to know what happened to her mother, Nora, a world-renowned anthropologist well-known for her research on ancient cultures and languages. Five years ago, Nora was found on the steps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

"We've never seen anything like it," said the NYPD. "It's as if she just fell asleep on the steps of the museum and never woke up." Eventually, the police gave up their search for answers. But Emerson didn't.

Her journey to discover the answers about her mother's mysterious death takes her deep below the streets of New York City on a dangerous adventure into a magical world of books. There, she learns the stunning truth about her mother and her own destiny to continue her mother's legacy.

Time is running out. An alarming threat looms large and too close to home. With the very existence of human imagination at stake, can Emerson find the strength to fulfill her mother's final wish before it's too late?
Emerson Page and Where The Light Enters by Christa Avampato is filled with beautifully descriptive language that conjures up images of magical places and its references to other works of literature make a reading nerd like me feel right at home. Read on for more of my review and ideas for classroom application.


Why I liked it: Emerson Page and Where The Light Enters is filled with beautifully descriptive language that conjures up images of magical places and its references to other works of literature make a reading nerd like me feel right at home. I loved the scene with Alice from Through the Looking Glass. There are also some great quotes about books and reading sprinkled in.

Rarely do I feel like a book is too short, but I think a bit more character development at the start of the book and slowing down the plot wouldn't hurt in this one. I didn't feel a strong connection with the main character and major events happened one right after another.


Classroom application: This book is definitely appropriate for middle school (no questionable or mature content here) and up. It can be difficult to find books that are truly appropriate for the middle grades within the fantasy genre. The novel's connections to the nine Muses and other elements of Greek mythology would make it a good pairing with a unit on ancient Greece and also a great recommendations for students who love the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series by Rick Riordan. The book could also serve as a mentor text for student writing; just a page or even a paragraph could be used to model descriptive and figurative language.

If you are interested in purchasing a copy of Emerson Page and Where The Light Enters for yourself, you can find it on Amazon here.

Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The Literary Maven is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

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